I'm reasonably sure Einstein was a dentist

Or possibly the tooth fairy

3 notes

lava-is-soft replied to your post “I saw your thesis on lolmythesis and I’m just really curious of what you’re researching and why do we use negative language with a positive meaning on tumblr?”

Ugh you bore me

IRONY RELIES ON THE CONTEXT BEING UNDERSTOOD YOUR STATEMENT IS AMBIGUOUS BUT I’M ASSUMING GIVEN THAT YOU LIKED THE POST YOU’RE BEING IRONIC AND ACTUALLY FIND ME VERY INTERESTING. IN WHICH CASE THANK YOU. IF YOU WERE BEING SERIOUS AND I ACTUALLY BORE YOU THEN THANK YOU I’M SORRY AND ALSO GET OUT.

Filed under lava-is-soft people i love

6 notes

angelsandthearchitect asked: I saw your thesis on lolmythesis and I'm just really curious of what you're researching and why do we use negative language with a positive meaning on tumblr?

Hey, thanks for asking! I’m a total nerd, and I love talking about my research xD

Irony is a fairly common device in English. There are different kinds of irony, like when the outcome contradicts the intention (e.g. “Sarah moves from Sydney to New York, meets an Aussie on her first day there and ends up marrying them” - NOT IRONIC, JUST COINCIDENCE, but “Sarah moves from Sydney to New York because she’s sick of Australians, runs into an Aussie on her first day there and ends up marrying them” - IRONIC) or dramatic irony, when the audience knows something that the characters don’t (e.g. every single one of Shakespeare’s plays EVER), and a whole raft of others. Sarcasm is a form of irony, and it falls under the category that’s relevant to the research I’m doing here (I’m not quite researching sarcasm, but it’s in the same family of irony, just for comparison).

The definition of irony that we’re working with in this case is “a statement which has an intended meaning opposite to its denotation” (denotation = the opposite of connotation. Denotation is a word’s literal meaning. For example, the word “pig” has the denotation “an animal of the genus Sus” but may have the connotation “someone who is dirty, greedy, lazy or otherwise unpleasant”). So our statements that we’re investigating are all about saying one thing, and meaning the opposite.

The trend that I’ve noticed on Tumblr is that people will use offensive or otherwise negative statements to refer to male celebrities that they find attractive (I first noticed it on a gif of Jensen Ackles tagged “ew gross”, which is where the title came from). It’s obvious from looking at the post and its surrounding context that they actually like the person they’re talking about, but their statement has a negative denotation. Pretty much, it’s textbook irony. This really interests me, because I love irony, and so I want to know the logistics of how this works. Who uses this irony, about whom, when, why, and to what extent? Does it indicate a greater or lesser amount of affection to call someone a “giant assface” rather than a “dick”? Is there a limit to the abuse before it stops being affectionate? Are there certain terms that can never be ironically affectionate? This is the kind of research I want to do. First I have to demonstrate academically that this kind of irony exists, so that’s what this particular paper is about. Once I’ve done that and the paper has been accepted, I’ll have described the whats and can then proceed to do more research investigating the whys whens and hows.

Hope that helps! Feel free to ask me any other questions you might have, I really genuinely love the research I’m doing so I’m happy to talk about it. Anything I post on the topic will be tagged “jensen ackles is gross” if you want to be kept up-to-date.

Filed under jensen ackles is gross my life irony research linguistics angelsandthearchitect Ask Me

48,877 notes

cherrychublicious92:

clockingcreativity:

meetmeincalifornia:

artemisfowlstolemysoul:

bronephreinel:

 Imagine Person A singing “You are my sunshine” as Person B slowly dies in their arms

what THE FUCK 

I DIDN’T FUCKING NEED THAT RIGHT NOW

FUCK YOU

imagine if person b sung it to comfort person a

YOU’RE NOT HELPING.

imagine person a not being able to finish the song because they’re crying so hard, and person b sings the last line for them, but doesn’t quite… make it… to the…

(via 221b-bacon-street)

Filed under FUCK YOU fuck you all sobbing

162 notes

Anonymous asked: would you ever consider learning to speak a more standard dialect of french or are you happy with your current accent? sorry if this is rude i'm just curious :s

enattendantlesoleil:

/sigh/ ok, this IS kind of rude but i’m going to answer you so that you never have to ask anyone this question again.

first of all, what is a “standard dialect” of french? you probably meant the kind of french spoken in northern metropolitan france. that alone is frustrating. there are 33 francophone countries in the world, if i’m not mistaken, and i’m tired of this idea that france is the default.

forget france for a second. consider canada, where west coast canadian french is different from ontarian french, which is different from québécois, which is different from acadian french. within quebec, the “standard” montreal dialect is different from the “standard” dialect spoken in saguenay, for example. and, like, let’s not even talk about joual. and while there may exist a concept of “standard québécois” — like the québécois you’ll hear on radio canada that doesn’t sound particularly like any regional dialect — you can hardly even extend that kind of thinking to include all of canada. suppose you did want to define some kind of standard canadian french. how would you do that? would you label “standard québécois” as the “standard canadian french” and ignore the fact that francophones in ontario and new brunswick sound completely different? take it one step further. how would you determine what constitutes a standard french dialect in north america? or in the western hemisphere? would you still take our “standard québécois” to be the default while ignoring a) other québécois dialects, b) other canadian dialects, c) louisiana french, d) haitian french, etc.?

and so, considering all this, how in the world do we expect to define a universal “standard french” when in addition to all the dialects i’ve already mentioned you have all the francophone countries in africa and europe and oceania? just how?

forget french, consider other languages. what’s a standard american dialect, is it the english spoken in seattle, or the english spoken in minnesota? what about various dialects of canadian english? what about the many british dialects? between “standard british english” and “standard american english” (assuming those are even possible to define), which one is more standard? what is “standard english”? are there two versions of it? are there more? what is “standard spanish”? what is “standard chinese”? “standard russian”?

having said all that, there does exist a notion of “standard french” but, predictably, it’s not something that can be exactly defined. defining a standard dialect is like defining a standard colour. if i presented you with a rainbow spectrum and asked you to do that, would you choose one of the colours and claim that it’s the standard, the way some people take “standard french” to mean “parisian french”? would you blend all the colours together and claim that the murky brown (that doesn’t even resemble anything on the spectrum) is your “standard”? should we create a “standard french” dialect by proportionally representing every regional dialect?

but no, i understand what you’re asking me. you’re asking if i would be willing or able to learn to comfortably speak this “standard french.” my answer is, i would certainly be able to, but why would i want to? why would i want to take the beautiful dialect that makes french speakers abroad say to me, “oh, vous êtes québécoise!” and actively mask it with a “standard” that was determined based on imperialistic, eurocentric thinking? i don’t go out of my way to hide my dialectical markers because i am not ashamed of being blatantly québécoise. if i’m talking to someone who’s not from here, i do almost subconsciously minimize the amount of region-specific words i use (e.g. i will probably say “voiture” instead of “char” if i’m talking to a french person even though i may very well say “char” if i’m talking to a quebecer), but that’s only because it’s easy to do and it makes it less likely that i’ll have to repeat myself.

but you know what really sucks? it’s this idea of having a “standard” dialect that everyone is expected to speak perpetuates. i went to school in ontario, literally 20 minutes away from the quebec border, and i once heard a teacher correct a francophone girl because she pronounced “treize” as /tʁaɛz/ instead of /tʁɛz/. that’s more than just sad, that’s insulting. that’s treating québécois, which frequently employs that pronunciation, as an inferior dialect, in much the same way that people in the northern US make fun of southern dialects. (say the word “y’all” in front of a group of seattleites and see how they react.) we need to put an end to this idea that there’s a single dialect of any given language that represents education, intelligence and class. it’s imperialistic, it’s racist, it’s classist, it’s a lot of really gross things, and it needs to stop.

so no. i am not willing to learn any “standard french.” i’m not going to throw the speakers of every non-standard dialect — including my entire province — under the bus just so that i can play this game of “listen to me taaaalk, i sound more ~standard~ than you.”

Filed under preach french linguistics language useful stuff canada

476,739 notes

journey-with-you-512:

bbcofficial:

islapoldppl:

cantwearhats:

technickel:

b-a-p-ontheblock:

thezefronposter:

effyeahfandoms:

tonystarktrek:

theangelshavetheearhat:

de4ctivate:

this might go over the heads of some of the kids on here. 

did you just

This is the greatest post I have ever seen because it is both a pun and a harsh truth.

IT’S TRANSPARENT

I showed this to my 11 year old brother and asked him if he knew what it was. He looked at it for a few seconds and said
"I dunno. a printer?"
a pRINTER

i’m 15 and i don’t get it

remember drawing on the plastic sheets and then casually smudging everything away aaah memories. 

STOP MAKING ME FEEL OLD INTERNET

Them loud ass flappy ass sheets.

we still use these at my school tho

we still use these at my school too…

my professor still uses these aND I’M AT UNIVERSITY

journey-with-you-512:

bbcofficial:

islapoldppl:

cantwearhats:

technickel:

b-a-p-ontheblock:

thezefronposter:

effyeahfandoms:

tonystarktrek:

theangelshavetheearhat:

de4ctivate:

this might go over the heads of some of the kids on here. 

did you just

This is the greatest post I have ever seen because it is both a pun and a harsh truth.

IT’S TRANSPARENT

I showed this to my 11 year old brother and asked him if he knew what it was. He looked at it for a few seconds and said

"I dunno. a printer?"

a pRINTER

i’m 15 and i don’t get it

remember drawing on the plastic sheets and then casually smudging everything away aaah memories. 

STOP MAKING ME FEEL OLD INTERNET

Them loud ass flappy ass sheets.

we still use these at my school tho

we still use these at my school too…

my professor still uses these aND I’M AT UNIVERSITY

(Source: transparent-like-your-balls, via annacwaine10)

Filed under ohp my life

28 notes

New Zealand Parliament - Unparliamentary language

This is a list of all the terms that New Zealand MPs have slung at each other over the years which have been deemed “unparliamentary” (plus some that were called into question but ultimately allowed).

It is the best thing I have seen all day, and I am sobbing.

Filed under new zealand linguistics language Language jokes politics useful stuff